BuzzReed-tn

Kip’s Tips: Ten Tips to Teach Purposeful, Productive Practice Dr. Kip Franklin Assistant Professor of Clarinet University of South Alabama kipfranklin@southalabama.edu Tip #1-Plan your practice time and stick to a consistent schedule Planning out your practice time is extremely important. Practice sessions cannot be afterthoughts or something that you get to once everything else has been accomplished. Otherwise you’ll never get to it! I tell my students to plan out their practice sessions as if they were classes to be attended daily. Even if you’re pressed for time, several smaller practice sessions will be much more beneficial than one marathon session. Consistent daily practice isRead More →

BuzzReed-tn

Why do I sometimes get a “grunt” sound when I articulate the notes around a high C? Sometimes just fingering high notes is not enough to get them to respond without an undertone, or “grunt” sound – clarinetists must actually adjust their voicing (throat position) so that they are able to tongue the note with a response that speaks right away. To improve this, try fingering an open G, but overblow the note to produce an altissimo D – it may feel like you’re opening your throat and blowing warm air as if you’re just about to yawn. Then try going down the clarinet chromaticallyRead More →

BuzzReed-tn

What can I do to make my throat tones more in tune and sound less airy? Throat tones on the clarinet (middle of the staff G, G-sharp, A, and B-flat) are notorious for their stuffy sound and sharp intonation. To combat this, most clarinetists use some type of resonance fingering so that more air goes through the clarinet, which normally results in a better tone and slightly lower pitch. Simply putting the right-hand fingers down for most of these notes will make a big improvement, but depending on your clarinet, there might be other fingerings that sound even better. Here are some suggestions: G                        G-sharp           Read More →